Freeing Lost Souls Release Day Blitz

FREEING LOST SOULS

By Tracy Kincaid

Book one in The Family Tree Series

 

Sarah Finny is an artist who prides herself on being a free spirit.

Her job sends her to Gettysburg, where she discovers a powerful connection to the legendary

battlefield. While exploring the historical landmark, Sarah comes upon park guide, Bruce Wilks

who has injured his leg.

After offering to help him, Sarah develops an unexpected attraction toward Bruce, which

threatens her heart as well as, her cherished nomadic way of life. A powerful and mysterious

entity brings them together hoping to enlist Sarah and Bruce in finding his own long-lost love

and, thereby, freeing lost souls.

 

* * *

Excerpt

ìHi, Iím Sarah Finny. I believe Bruce Wilks called to set up a costume for me.î

She looks at her computer. As she searches for the order, I look around the shop at tons of Civil

War props. God, I wish my dad were here to see all of this. Iíll have to send him a picture of our

little group in our costumes. He will freak out when he sees it.

ìAw, here it is. Let me run in the back to get it. Be right back.î She goes into the back room while

I browse. I hear the bell over the door ring, and I turn to see Bruce walk in.

ìHey, you,î he announces as he walks over to me and gives me a hug. The hugging is a new

thing, but Iím fine with it. I would love to melt into his arms someday.

ìHi, I was just stopping by to get my costume. What are you up to?î

ìSame as you. Figured I had a break from giving tours to swing by and pick up mine.î

ìI thought you had your own.î I laugh.

ìWell, actually I do. I think everyone who has grown up here has had several over the years, but

I needed a new one. So I had Mary make me one.î He shrugs.

ìHere you go, Sarah,î Mary states as she comes out of the back. ìOh, hey, Bruce, you here to

pick yours up as well?î

ìIf itís ready, I can take it. I was in the area.î

ìSure, give me a second,î Mary says as she lays my costume on the counter then goes off into

the back again.

ìSo what are you up to now?î Bruce inquires of me.

ìI thought I would get some lunch. How about you?î

ìWould you like to get some lunch together?î

ìSure, that would be great.î

Mary comes back to the front, holding a bag for Bruce. ìYou two need anything else?î she

asks.

ìNo, I think we have everything we need. Thanks again, Mary. See you soon,î Bruce says.

ìNice to meet you, Sarah. Have fun this weekend.î

ìThanks, Mary.î

After getting our costumes, we put them in our cars then walk to a little sandwich shop on the

corner. We get a table outside since itís such a nice day.

ìSo, what is it that we do at this reenactment?î I ask.

ìYou will be at one of the hospitals they have set up in town. Youíll be pretending to be a nurse.

Iíll be in the Wheatfield, at least during the battle. We just do what they instruct us to do. Itís

really easy, actually.î

ìSo who decided what weíre doing?î I ask because I find it strange that Iím to be a nurse.

ìActually, the Historical Society works with the genealogy people. If some of the re-enactors had

family in the war, then they base their roles on that. For instance, since Edward Wilks was

wounded in the Wheatfield, that is where Iíll be. You, on the other hand, are a woman, not that

there is anything wrong with that.î He grins. ìBut since you had a nurse in the war, they thought

the best place for you was the hospital.î

ìI guess that makes sense.î

ìThose who didnít have anyone in the war fill in where needed. Itís a whole production, really. I

just do what they say.î

ìIt does sound interesting. I havenít seen you around much. What have you been up to?î I

ask.

ìTourist season. Why, you miss me?î he teases.

ìOf course. I thought you were my own personal tour guide. I didnít think I had to share you with

anyone,î I tease back.

ìHow about I take you out before the craziness starts?î

ìSure, when?î

ìThat depends on what youíd like to do. Are you sick of the Civil War stuff yet? If so, we can go

somewhere outside of town and catch a movie or dancing. Or we can stay in town and enjoy the

festivities.î

ìYou dance?î I laugh.

ìIíve been known to cut a rug now and then.î He feigns being hurt.

ìWell, I canít dance worth a damn except what we were doing at the concert, but that really

wasnít dancing, so how about the stuff in town?î

ìSure, itís actually not so bad. They have a festival that starts tonight. Itís your typical county fair

type stuff, too much deep fried food, carnival rides, the whole nine yards.î

ìSounds like fun. So when are we going?î I wonder if that is how he sees it.

ìIím taking a few days off, so if you donít have anything pressing tomorrow, we could go

tonight.î

ìItís a date, then?î I wish, crossing my fingers like I used to do when I was a kid, hoping

something would go my way.

ìItís a date if you want it to be. No pressure.î He looks at me and blushes.

ìNo worries. I was wondering when you were going to ask me out on a real date.î

ìReally? I had no idea.î He smiles, showing those adorable dimples.

ìI thought I gave you enough hints. Guess Iím out of practice.î

* * *

Tracy Kincaid

Tracy Kincaid is a native Southern California girl who recently transplanted to South Western

Pennsylvania. A wife and mother of three. When she is not writing you can find her reading or

crafting. She enjoys the outdoors, whether it be working in the garden or hanging out with family

and friends. ìChanging Livesî is her debut novel.

 

Author contact links:

Website: www.tkincaidauthor.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/tracykincaidauthor

Twitter: @tkincaidauthor

 

Book one in The Family Tree Series

 

Sarah Finny is an artist who prides herself on being a free spirit.

Her job sends her to Gettysburg, where she discovers a powerful connection to the legendary

battlefield. While exploring the historical landmark, Sarah comes upon park guide, Bruce Wilks

who has injured his leg.

After offering to help him, Sarah develops an unexpected attraction toward Bruce, which

threatens her heart as well as, her cherished nomadic way of life. A powerful and mysterious

entity brings them together hoping to enlist Sarah and Bruce in finding his own long-lost love

and, thereby, freeing lost souls.

 

* * *

Excerpt

ìHi, Iím Sarah Finny. I believe Bruce Wilks called to set up a costume for me.î

She looks at her computer. As she searches for the order, I look around the shop at tons of Civil

War props. God, I wish my dad were here to see all of this. Iíll have to send him a picture of our

little group in our costumes. He will freak out when he sees it.

ìAw, here it is. Let me run in the back to get it. Be right back.î She goes into the back room while

I browse. I hear the bell over the door ring, and I turn to see Bruce walk in.

ìHey, you,î he announces as he walks over to me and gives me a hug. The hugging is a new

thing, but Iím fine with it. I would love to melt into his arms someday.

ìHi, I was just stopping by to get my costume. What are you up to?î

ìSame as you. Figured I had a break from giving tours to swing by and pick up mine.î

ìI thought you had your own.î I laugh.

ìWell, actually I do. I think everyone who has grown up here has had several over the years, but

I needed a new one. So I had Mary make me one.î He shrugs.

ìHere you go, Sarah,î Mary states as she comes out of the back. ìOh, hey, Bruce, you here to

pick yours up as well?î

ìIf itís ready, I can take it. I was in the area.î

ìSure, give me a second,î Mary says as she lays my costume on the counter then goes off into

the back again.

ìSo what are you up to now?î Bruce inquires of me.

ìI thought I would get some lunch. How about you?î

ìWould you like to get some lunch together?î

ìSure, that would be great.î

Mary comes back to the front, holding a bag for Bruce. ìYou two need anything else?î she

asks.

ìNo, I think we have everything we need. Thanks again, Mary. See you soon,î Bruce says.

ìNice to meet you, Sarah. Have fun this weekend.î

ìThanks, Mary.î

After getting our costumes, we put them in our cars then walk to a little sandwich shop on the

corner. We get a table outside since itís such a nice day.

ìSo, what is it that we do at this reenactment?î I ask.

ìYou will be at one of the hospitals they have set up in town. Youíll be pretending to be a nurse.

Iíll be in the Wheatfield, at least during the battle. We just do what they instruct us to do. Itís

really easy, actually.î

ìSo who decided what weíre doing?î I ask because I find it strange that Iím to be a nurse.

ìActually, the Historical Society works with the genealogy people. If some of the re-enactors had

family in the war, then they base their roles on that. For instance, since Edward Wilks was

wounded in the Wheatfield, that is where Iíll be. You, on the other hand, are a woman, not that

there is anything wrong with that.î He grins. ìBut since you had a nurse in the war, they thought

the best place for you was the hospital.î

ìI guess that makes sense.î

ìThose who didnít have anyone in the war fill in where needed. Itís a whole production, really. I

just do what they say.î

ìIt does sound interesting. I havenít seen you around much. What have you been up to?î I

ask.

ìTourist season. Why, you miss me?î he teases.

ìOf course. I thought you were my own personal tour guide. I didnít think I had to share you with

anyone,î I tease back.

ìHow about I take you out before the craziness starts?î

ìSure, when?î

ìThat depends on what youíd like to do. Are you sick of the Civil War stuff yet? If so, we can go

somewhere outside of town and catch a movie or dancing. Or we can stay in town and enjoy the

festivities.î

ìYou dance?î I laugh.

ìIíve been known to cut a rug now and then.î He feigns being hurt.

ìWell, I canít dance worth a damn except what we were doing at the concert, but that really

wasnít dancing, so how about the stuff in town?î

ìSure, itís actually not so bad. They have a festival that starts tonight. Itís your typical county fair

type stuff, too much deep fried food, carnival rides, the whole nine yards.î

ìSounds like fun. So when are we going?î I wonder if that is how he sees it.

ìIím taking a few days off, so if you donít have anything pressing tomorrow, we could go

tonight.î

ìItís a date, then?î I wish, crossing my fingers like I used to do when I was a kid, hoping

something would go my way.

ìItís a date if you want it to be. No pressure.î He looks at me and blushes.

ìNo worries. I was wondering when you were going to ask me out on a real date.î

ìReally? I had no idea.î He smiles, showing those adorable dimples.

ìI thought I gave you enough hints. Guess Iím out of practice.î

* * *

Tracy Kincaid

Tracy Kincaid is a native Southern California girl who recently transplanted to South Western

Pennsylvania. A wife and mother of three. When she is not writing you can find her reading or

crafting. She enjoys the outdoors, whether it be working in the garden or hanging out with family

and friends. ìChanging Livesî is her debut novel.

 

Author contact links:

Website: www.tkincaidauthor.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/tracykincaidauthor

 

Twitter: @tkincaidauthor

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